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Online chat: History of the Urdu language

  

Online chat: 
history of the Urdu language




 Are you passionate about Urdu and want to know a bit more about its history?

 Join our Language Manager, Zafar Syed, for an online chat about the history of the Urdu language.

 We will begin with a short, interactive talk about the topic, and will then have a participative session to collect and translate vocabulary related the  language's history.

 You will become part of the Urdu living dictionary, leaving your contribution in a fun and easy way, and 'e-meet' other lovers of Urdu.


Theme: We'll get together online to talk about the history of Urdu, and to collect and translate related vocabulary.

When? 11/11 at 19:00 (local time in Pakistan)
For how  
long? 
 1 hour

What  will you 

have to do?



 Just log in on our online meeting space (desktop or tablet recommended) with the link you will get upon registering and have the Urdu living  dictionary open on another window as well.
 We'll provide all the directions and you can ask questions at any point.  
 You will not need to translate more than 20-30 words.



Why  take part 

in it?




 You'll find out more about the history of Urdu, and will also become part of the living dictionary, helping preserve digital resources for the language,  which will then be made available to the community on the living dictionary site.
 You will also have a chance to meet our Language Manager, Zafar, and fellow community members who share a love and interest for Urdu.
 And it will be fun.



How do  I 

sign up?

 If you want to join us, click here to register and book a place.
 You will also need to be signed up to the Urdu living dictionary: if you haven't yet, sign up for a free account here.
 You will receive an email confirming your booking. If you have any trouble registering or joining the session on the day, please consult our Mini-word  marathons' quick guide.


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